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American Museum Of Natural History Sharks

The American Museum Of Natural History’s Newest Exhibition Is All About Sharks

SHARKSNow Open at the Museum

If you think you hate sharks, you’ll love this exhibit. That’s because you’ll learn so much about sharks, it’ll bust all your preconceived ideas that they are out to get you. The exhibit showcases more than 500 species of sharks from ancient to modern day with life-size and hand-made models, a 37 foot wide movie screen of up close footage from Discovery’s Shark Week, touch-free interactive technology, games and more including a game where museumgoers can “hunt like a hammerhead” by directing a shark through electroreceptiona sixth sense that allows them to detect invisible electromagnetic fields.

John Sparks, curator of Sharks says, “The perception of sharksthat they are large, vicious predators to be fearedcouldnt be farther from the truth. We hope people walk away from this exciting exhibition with a new appreciation for sharks and understand they are magnificent creatures that should be revered, not feared.

Dates: December 15, 2021 to April 1st, 2022

Museum Hours: Wednesday to Sunday 10:00 AM to 5:30 PM

Location: American Museum of Natural History – 200 Central Park West New York, NY. Gallery 3, 3rd floor.

Timed entry only.

Go Into The Deep With Sharks At Amnh’s New Exhibition

With an 8 year old in my house who is obsessed with all things ocean, the opening of the new Sharks exhibition at the American Museum of Natural History is being met with more than a little impatience, but it is absolutely worth the wait. The museum’s newest interactive exhibit aims to dispel many of the myths surrounding sharks and the idea that they are terrifying. It does exactly that and makes it fun for both kids and adults.

Read on for our full review of the exhibit at one of our favorite kid-friendly museums in NYC, and find more must-see exhibits in our Museums Guide.

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Please keep in mind the Key to NYC rules, which now require all visitors ages 5+ to show proof of vaccination for indoor entertainment.

When you enter Sharks you are surrounded by huge black screens featuring almost life-sized sharks swimming between the screens and surrounding you, immersing you immediately in their world.

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The Parade of Sharks is an enlightening look at the species’ diversity.

You then come face to face with a huge model of a prehistoric shark known as the Megalodonmy sons favoritewhich doesnt do a lot to dispel fear, though it is a wonderfully impactful start to the exhibit.

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Enjoy a shark’s eye view in the interactive Hunt Like a Hammerhead display.

Sharks Exhibition In New York Aims To Change The ‘jaws’ Image

Richard Drew / APEuronewsAP

Are sharks getting a bad rep that they don’t really deserve? Most people think of them as deadly predators when on average only 77 attacks take place every year worldwide.

Lauri Halderman, vice president for exhibition at New York’s American Museum of Natural History, says the species that has been around for more than 450 million years is clearly misunderstood.

She created the temporary exhibition ‘Sharks’ in their honour, to separate fact from fiction.

“They got their mouths open and a lot of big, sharp teeth, and they look like they’re coming right at you. And sure, that’s true of some sharks. But sharks don’t really hardly ever attack people. They’re just not that into you. And in reality, we fish and catch tens of millions of sharks every year. So we’re a much bigger threat to them than they are to us,” Halderman revealed.

The exhibit, which opened last month, has life-sized models of different species to offer visitors a real-life perspective on size.

“It’s a real life-size model. That big shark is a megalodon. It’s extinct now, but it was the largest predatory fish that ever lived. And elsewhere in the prey, we have the whale shark that is around today. It’s the largest fish alive today, but it’s not a predator. It feeds on zooplankton and smaller organisms, so it has teeny, tiny teeth. You don’t even see it, and it’s a filter feeder,” she explained.

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Mako Shark Model In The Hall Of Biodiversity

The shortfin mako is the fastest shark around around: this species hits top speeds of 45-60 miles per hour when hunting tuna, one of the fastest fish alive. A protractible jaw helps mako snatch its prey: when mako catches a tuna, its jaw projects outward, helping extend its reach and snatch its huge prey. Use the Museum’s free Explorer app to get turn-by-turn directions to this model in the Hall of Biodiversity and launch the app’s AR experience to see its powerful jaws in action!

A life-size model of a whale shark hangs on the back wall of the Milstein Hall of Ocean Life, just past the tail of the blue whale.

A life-size model of a whale shark hangs on the back wall of the Milstein Hall of Ocean Life, just past the tail of the blue whale.

Ancient Shark Fossil Reveals New Insights Into Jaw Evolution

The model of a mako shark, at the American Museum of ...

The skull of a newly discovered 325-million-year-old shark-like species suggests that early cartilaginous and bony fishes have more to tell us about the early evolution of jawed vertebratesincluding humansthan do modern sharks, as was previously thought. The new study, led by scientists at the American Museum of Natural History, shows that living sharks are actually quite advanced in evolutionary terms, despite having retained their basic sharkiness over millions of years. The research is published today in the journal Nature.

The exceptionally well-preserved fossil of Ozarcus mapesae from two different lateral views. The scale bar is 10 millimeters. ©AMNH/F. Ippolito

Sharks are traditionally thought to be one of the most primitive surviving jawed vertebrates. And most textbooks in schools today say that the internal jaw structures of modern sharks should look very similar to those in primitive shark-like fishes, said Alan Pradel, a postdoctoral researcher at the Museum and the lead author of the study. But weve found thats not the case. The modern shark condition is very specialized, very derived, and not primitive.

A 3D reconstruction of the skull of Ozarcus mapesae. The braincase is shown in light grey, the jaw is shown in red, the hyoid arch is shown in blue, and the gill arches are shown in yellow. ©AMNH/A. Pradel

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The American Museum Of Natural History Announces New Exhibition: Sharks

FEATURING DOZENS OF LIFE-SIZED MODELS RANGING FROM 33 FEET TO 5 INCHES LONG, NEW EXHIBITION BRINGS VISITORS FACE TO FACE WITH VAST DIVERSITY OF SHARK SPECIES, FROM THE ANCIENT MEGAPREDATOR MEGALODON TO THE TINY POCKET SHARK

OPENS TO MUSEUM MEMBERS ON DECEMBER 10 AND TO THE PUBLIC ON DECEMBER 15

People have been fascinated by sharks for as long as we have been exploring the oceans. Fixed in the public imagination as toothy, fearsome predators, sharks are far more fascinating, and more complex, than their depiction in popular culture. Sharks, a new exhibition opening at the American Museum of Natural History this winter, will bring to life the incredible diversity of this ancient group of fishes and will offer visitors a unique look at pre-historic and modern shark species, their habitats and hunting styles, and the conservation threats these magnificent animals are facing today.

Sharks will open to the public on Wednesday, December 15, 2021. Museum Members will be able to preview the exhibition from Friday, December 10, through Sunday, December 12.

American Museum of Natural History

HoursThe Museum is open Wednesday-Sunday, 10 am5:30 pm. The Museum is closed on Thanksgiving and Christmas.

General Admission, which includes admission to all permanent exhibition halls and the Rose Center for Earth and Space but does not include special exhibitions, giant-screen 2D or 3D film, or Space Show, is $23 , $18 , and $13 . All prices are subject to change.

Health Protocols

New Sharks Exhibit Coming To American Museum Of Natural History

NEW YORK – A new sharks exhibit is coming to the American Museum of Natural History.

CBS2 got a preview of it.

Starting this month, you’ll get to see dozens of life-sized models of sharks ranging from 33 feet to five inches long.

There’ll be fossils from from diverse species of sharks, along with an interactive exhibit that challenges visitors to hunt like a hammerhead.

The exhibit is open to the public on Dec. 15.

    In:

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What To Experience At Amnhs New Sharks Exhibit

According to scientists at the museum, sharks face more dangers from humans than we do from them. They are more threatened, than threatening. At the new Sharks exhibit, youll learn about the conservation issues facing sharks today, including overfishing and habitat destruction. Youll also discover amazing facts about the ancient megalodon, torpedo ray, great whites, tiger sharks, the dwarf lantern shark and many other species through fun and awe-inspiring displays and experiences that showcase shark diversity, anatomy and behavior. Exhibit highlights include:

  • A Shark Parade: Venture through a spectacular parade of more than 30 life-like models that range in size from 5 inches to a whopping 33 feet in length.
  • Fossils: See real animal fossils from the museums extensive collections and current research.
  • Interactive Hunting: Visitors can take part in an immersive challenge to hunt like a hammerhead, a species named because of the unique structure of their head !
  • Media Presentations: Just wave your hand over these touch-free media stations to uncover fascinating traits and facts about sharks.

Sharks is curated by John Sparks, curator in the museums Department of Ichthyology in the Division of Vertebrate Zoology.

Chain Catshark Model In Unseen Oceans

Science Bulletins: Sharksthe Past (2 of 2)

Did you know that some sharks glow with bright fluorescence that is invisible to the human eye? To us, chain catsharks appear tan with brownish black markings, but to other members of this species, whose eyes are packed with rods that can detect even very tiny amounts of light, the lines on their skin glow bright greenjust like on the model on view in Unseen Oceans, a special exhibition open now through August 18, 2019. Chain catsharks fluorescent markings help these fish recognize each other in dimly lit waters more than 200 feet below the surface.

Visitor tip: Members see Unseen Oceans for free!

A life-size model of a Mako Shark in the Hall of Biodiversity.

A life-size model of a Mako Shark in the Hall of Biodiversity.

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What Youll See In Sharks

Sharks offers visitors a unique look at prehistoric and modern species, their habitats and hunting styles, and the conservation threats these spectacular animals face today. D. Finnin/© AMNH Visitors can step into a life-sized replica of the jaws of the prehistoric mega-predator megalodon, known as Tyrannosaurus rex of the seas. D. Finnin/© AMNH A variety of fossils from the Museums collections are featured in the exhibition, including Ischyodus avitus, the 50-million-year-old Heliobatis, and the extinct angel shark Pseudorhina speciosa. D. Finnin/© AMNH

The new exhibition Sharks features dozens of life-sized models ranging from 33 feet to 5.5 inches long, fossils from the Museums collections, touch-free interactive exhibits that challenge visitors to hunt like a hammerhead, and more for visitors of all ages.

Ancient Sharks

Around 450 million years ago, one branch of fishesancient relatives of sharksplit off from the rest. Unlike most fishes, which have bony skeletons, this branch of the tree has skeletons made of cartilage.

Come face-to-face with a life-sized model of megalodon, the biggest predatory fish of all time, and see fossils of other extinct species, including Helicoprion, nicknamed the buzzsaw shark.

Teeth and Jaws

Humans replace our baby teeth just once. But sharks replace their teeth every few weeks, over and over, for their entire lives.

Biggest to Smallest Sharks

Super Sensors

JOHN SPARKS : The public perception of sharks is that they are

New Sharks Exhibit At Amnh Opening Soon To Fascinate Kids Of All Ages

November 5, 2021 By Barbara Russo

Think you know everything about sharks, the apex predators of the sea? Think again! The American Museum of Natural Historys new exhibit, Sharks, aims to debunk common misconceptions about these magnificent creatures and impress shark lovers of all ages. The exhibit opens Dec. 15 and will feature dozens of life-size shark models ranging from the enormous megalodon to the adorably tiny pocket shark that fits in the palm of your hand!

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New American Museum Of Natural History Exhibit Aims To Change The Publics Perception About Sharks

The gaping jaws of a scientifically accurate model of megalodon greets visitors to “Sharks,” the … newest exhibition at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City.

Even before the movie Jaws, sharks have been held in public fascination as far back as humans have been exploring the worlds oceans. A new exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City dives further into how these animals came about, changed over time and what theyre facing today.

Having opened on December 15, 2021, Sharks highlights the diversity of these creatures through dozens of life-sized models that range in size from five inches long to 33 feet in length. The exhibition will also provide a look at their prehistoric and modern species, their habitats and hunting styles and the conservation threats that sharks face today.

Along with providing scientific information, the exhibit is designed to debunk incorrect perceptions about sharks. It is to explain why sharks are essential in the natural world and why they shouldnt be considered as a major threat to humans.

“Sharks,” on view at the American Museum of Natural History now through mid-August 2022, showcases … the diversity of sharks through life-sized models.

Visitors to “Sharks” can hunt like a hammerhead in a touch-free interactive exhibit that invites … visitors to direct a shark, which uses electroreception to detect prey.

Whale Shark In The Milstein Hall Of Ocean Life

Natural History Museum: Megalodon Shark

Did you know that the worlds largest fish is actually a shark named after a mammal? Whale sharks can grow more than 40 feet in length. But while this species is hugeeven larger than the fearsome great whiteit’s a filter feeder, snacking on small fish, squid, and krill. See a life-sized model of a whale shark in the Milstein Hall of Ocean Life.

Bonus whale shark: Get up close with these majestic animals in the special 360-video immersive experience Swimming with Giants, open daily through August 18 in the same gallery.

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Sharks At The American Museum Of Natural History

NEW EXHIBITION BRINGS VISITORS FACE TO FACE WITH VAST DIVERSITY OF SHARK SPECIES AND REVEALS SURPRISING FACTS ABOUT ONE OF THE OCEANS MAGNIFICENT AND OFTEN MISUNDERSTOOD TOP PREDATORS

People have been intrigued by sharks for as long as we have been exploring the oceans. Fixed in the public imagination as toothy, fearsome predators, sharks are far more fascinating, and more complex, than their depiction in popular culture. The American Museum of Natural Historys new exhibition Sharks, brings to life the incredible diversity of sharks with dozens of life-sized models, ranging from 33 feet to 5 inches long, and offers visitors a unique look at prehistoric and modern species, their habitats and hunting styles, and the conservation threats these spectacular animals face today.

We are delighted to give our visitors the chance to meet and learn about sharks in this intriguing, eye-opening exhibition that is also great fun, said Ellen V. Futter, President of the American Museum of Natural History. This ancient and highly diverse group of animals is so much more than the popular depictions of them, and this exhibition uses amazing technology and techniques such as touch-free interactives and the Museums world-renowned model-making to bring sharks up close and personal for visitors of all ages.

Sharks At American Museum Of Natural History Opens December 15 2021

People have been fascinated by sharks for as long as we have been exploring the oceans. Fixed in the public imagination as toothy, fearsome predators, sharks are far more fascinating, and more complex, than their depiction in popular culture. Sharks, a new exhibition opening at the American Museum of Natural History this winter, will bring to life the incredible diversity of this ancient group of fishes and will offer visitors a unique look at pre-historic and modern shark species, their habitats and hunting styles, and the conservation threats these magnificent animals are facing today.

Installation views of Sharks at American Museum of Natural History. Photos by Corrado Serra.

Sharks is curated by John Sparks, curator in the Museums Department of Ichthyology in the Division of Vertebrate Zoology. Sharks has also drawn on the expertise of John Maisey, curator-in-charge emeritus, fossil fish, Division of Paleontology.

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Shark Exhibit Opens At American Museum Of Natural History

NEW YORK A new exhibit opens Wednesday at the American Museum of Natural History . Take a big bite out of the Big Apple by visiting the sharks moving into Manhattans Upper West Side.

The museums new shark exhibit features dozens of actual-size models of many types of sharks. They were created at the museum and range from 5 inches to 33 feet long.

Lauri Halderman is vice president for exhibitions at AMNH. She says, This is the first temporary exhibit that has opened since the pandemic. We are thrilled to have a new exhibit and people can come check out the sharks.

Fossils from the permanent collections are also on display, and there are several interactive exhibits. Find more information about the exhibit, which runs through Aug. 14, 2022.

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